how to pull off an all-nighter?

How to Stay Awake All Night to Study – Learn 11 Healthy Ways?

A big submission due tomorrow? Or maybe an exam where you’ve a mountain to climb in a single night? Willy-nilly, most students need to pull out that occasional all-nighter to atone for procrastination.

How can you make an all-nighter, first of all, feasible (it’s tough, isn’t it?) and, then, less taxing on your body?

In this post, I’ll cover when you must completely avoid an all-nighter, how you can make it less painful, and what you should do the next day to recover from it fast.

how much sleep do students need

How Much Sleep Do High-School and College Students Need? [Research-backed]

More than 90 percent of American High School students and nearly 70 percent of college students are chronically sleep deprived, resulting in academic and health consequences.

If you’re like most, then you too are getting far less sleep than recommended for a balanced life.

National Sleep Foundation put together a high-powered panel of 18 scientists and researchers from reputed medical associations in the U.S. to study our daily sleep requirement. The panel gleaned through more than 300 studies, and came up with following recommendations:

test-taking strategies for multiple choice exams

6 Test-Taking Strategies for Multiple Choice Exams [Backed by Data]

Ever got stuck on multiple-choice questions in a test where you were not certain about the answer? Or, you had to rush through the last few questions due to paucity of time.

When faced with such situations, the best you can do is eliminate as many options as possible and make an educated guess?

Educated guess!

Yes, that’s one of the obvious secrets behind the success of top test-takers in multiple-choice exams.

But, are you really making educated guesses?

why students panic in exams and how to avoid it

Faced Nerves and Panic Attack in Exams? Learn 7 (Research-Backed) Ways to Control It

(Warning: it’s a long post, but it’ll answer your query on the topic thoroughly.)

14 April 1996.

US Masters.

In one of the worst chokes in golfing history, Greg Norman, the then world no. 1, squandered an almost unbridgeable lead of six shots to lose by a big margin of five shots to Nick Faldo.

3 July 1993.

Women’s singles final at Wimbledon.

Jana Novotna lost the first set 6-7 to Steffi Graf. Won the second 6-1, and was leading 4-1, 40-30 in the final set.

She had the momentum and, more importantly, a massive lead. Yet she failed to close out the match and lost five games in a row from there to concede the final set (and the match), 4-6.

student procrastinating

How to Stop Procrastinating and Start Studying – 7 Practical Steps

Have you switched to Facebook or checked the score of your favourite sports just before starting an important, though unpleasant, assignment from your school?

Have you stared at the blank screen of your laptop for long and then moved to something else when writing the first few paragraphs of the paper due next week?

Have you enjoyed planning and brainstorming sessions a lot, but pushed deadlines when it came to execution?

We all have fallen to these when starting out on an important task, and wondered, “How can I move my butt, and then not quit?

how to combat digital distractions

How to Get Rid of Distractions from Smartphones and Internet?

Morning.

You take the seat in your favorite corner, and open your math notes. Today you’re determined to complete the assignment you’ve been procrastinating for almost a week.

However, just before starting, you decide to check your inbox. You check, and you don’t find anything worth your attention. (That’s what is going to happen if you check too frequently.) Because it got done so quickly, your digital-thirst isn’t quenched. You decide to skim your Facebook feed as well. After all, you plan to be off internet for three hours immediately after this.

You’re on a slippery slope now. You like (thumbs up) few pictures, leave few comments, chuckle at a funny video, and then click on a click-bait BuzzFeed article, which lets you slip further to a YouTube video. And then few suggested videos from YouTube’s long list of seductive thumbnails and titles…

By now, you’re neck deep in entertainment and procrastination, ignoring what you set out to do.

Sounds familiar?

self-study vs. group-study

2 Reasons Why Self-Study Is Better than Group-Study

Do you envy your classmates who study in a group? After all, it’s not easy to get illustrious classmates to rub brains with and get the benefit of knowledge of others.

If you do… then, well, you don’t need to. Because you, as a lone soul furrowing through your books and notes, are likely studying more efficiently than your classmates studying in a group.

In this post, I’ll enumerate reasons for and against group-study, and talk why self-study is better. Although there are several arguments in favor of and against each, two very fundamentals of efficient study – how you learn something and how you focus – go in favor of self-study, which kind of outweigh other factors.

That, however, doesn’t mean group-study shouldn’t get a place in your schedule. It should. As you’ll figure out in the latter part of the post, it trumps (no political connotations!) self-study under one condition.

study in daylight to increase productivity

Study Longer Without Getting Tired: Study in Daylight

Sunlight is better known for synthesis of vitamin D in our bodies and for improving our moods. But what is less appreciated is that it can also make us more productive.

If you study in sunlight (not direct exposure, though), you’ll be significantly more alert, less drowsy in the afternoon, thereby increasing your productivity. As a result, you’ll have a more effective study schedule and you’ll be able to study longer without getting tired.

test anxiety

How to Overcome Test-Taking Anxiety – Steps for 4 Phases of the Exam?

Have you ever sabotaged your chances in an exam because you were overly nervous?

Have you blanked-out, even for minutes?

Or have you find it difficult to concentrate while taking a test?

Burdened by expectations, fear of failure, and poor time management skills among other reasons, many students face these situations.

According to this study, 25 to 40 percent of students experience test anxiety. And, as you may have experienced, anxiety can have deleterious effect on your performance. One study found that highly test-anxious students score about 12 percentile points below their less anxious peers. This is average, though; some, of course, perform way below this.

You may be prepared to the teeth, but test-anxiety may still undo weeks and months of hard work in a matter of few hours.

And when?

When it probably matters the most!