what to eat when studying

What to Eat When Studying for Better Focus and Energy?

You would’ve heard it all – eat every 2-3 hours, don’t have too much caffeine, keep hydrated, eat healthy, and so on.

But do you know that certain types of food, which also happen to be the most regularly consumed by students, can send your energy level soaring to the top of the rollercoaster, and in short time, to its lowest point. And this crash can deprive you of the much needed energy to focus on the task at hand, including studying, something you can prevent by a better choice of what you eat or drink.

Imagine, this happening during an important day, say the day you’re taking an important test or the day you really need to slog at high efficiency to pull off that last-minute submission.

why take study breaks?

Why Study-Breaks? What Are Some Effective Study-Break Ideas?

Alejandro Lleras, Associate Professor of Psychology at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in his acclaimed study, found that brief diversion from your task can dramatically improve your ability to focus on a task for prolonged periods.

Your experience, too, will tell you that when you study without break for long duration, say 90 minutes, you tend to lose focus, your mind starts wavering.

So, if you’ve been slogging hard for over an hour on your assignment or for exam, you may be working well below your potential. Wasting time, in other words.

Moreover, you also need to be intentional about what you should be doing during those study-breaks, otherwise they’ll be less effective.

In this post, I’ll first cover why study breaks make you more productive and, toward the end, what are some good and some bad study-break ideas.

why some people are more intelligent than others

Nature vs. Nurture: Why Are Some People More Intelligent, Smarter?

If you’re a student who wants to crack the toughest exams out there, you would’ve marveled the effortless ease with which the brightest consistently finish in top 0.1 percentile.

If you’re a wannabe tennis player, you would be in awe of the games of Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic.

“Their brain, their body is wired differently.”

“They’ve natural talent.”

“They’ve innate ability.”

“They’re blessed.”

These thoughts cross your mind, and you convince yourself to live a ‘normal’ life because you can’t change your wiring, because you can’t create talent out of nowhere, and because blessings are divine.

What if I tell you that these things matter much, much less – if at all they do – than you think? (As we’ll learn later in the post, wiring, for example, depends only on our experiences.) What if I tell you that there is a path accessible to everyone that can take you too to the dizzying levels of some of these greats?

how children can develop grit?

How Children Can Learn Grit, the Biggest Key to Success?

You may be smart, talented, and curious, and yet fail to achieve what some of your less illustrious peers have… if you aren’t gritty.

You may have high IQ, and yet finish your school/ college with a low GPA… if you aren’t gritty.

Fins call it sisu; Dutch, gruis. It goes by different names across the world, but, as research is unravelling factors behind success, it is being considered as the single biggest predictor of high achievement (tough pursuits, the ones that bring big successes).

HBS-Stanford dual admits

Why Bloomberg Survey on HBS-Stanford Dual Admits Is Not Representative?

A 2015 Bloomberg survey throws up surprising data on HBS-Stanford rivalry on MBA admissions. Of 63 dual admits (a good sample size considering that only about 150-odd applicants get accepted to both the schools) they surveyed, 56% opted for Stanford, 22% for HBS, and a whopping 22% for a school other than the two.

In this post, I’ll analyze the aforesaid data, using independent data on yield, number of dual admits, and number of accepted applicants, and show why it is not representative of the choices made by HBS-Stanford dual admits in the class of 2014.

(Warning: the analysis involves some calculation.)

growth mindset

Growth Mindset: The Dark Matter That Can Improve Your Abilities

After a poor performance in the mid-term test (or at any other task), have your thoughts wandered in this direction:

“I’m a total failure.”

“I suck in math.”

“Everyone else seems to be doing better than me. I’m just not cut out for this.”

“Life is unfair, and my efforts are not going to make a difference.”

“The teacher is biased.”

If such thoughts often cross your mind, then you display fixed mindset, one of the two mindsets (the other being growth mindset) first articulated by Carol Dweck, one of the world’s leading researchers on achievement and success, and the author of bestseller Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.

When you finish an article or book on how a superstar became successful, I bet most of you wonder, “How can I emulate this guy?” You, of course, know ‘ten ways to be A+ student’ and the like, but you also know that knowledge of those ten ways is not enough. They alone won’t take you there. You need few underlying, invisible forces working like your DNA to lead you there.