learn English fast

How to Learn Spoken English Fast – 8 Ways?

This post is about learning spoken English fast, and not about becoming fluent in 10 or 30 days. I don’t want to disappoint you, but it’s nearly impossible to become fluent in 30 days.

Many who are advocating fluency in such short period either have different notion of fluency or aren’t being authentic. You don’t have to believe me on this. Just try those methods verbatim and see where you reach in 30 days.

why you can't speak fluent English in 30 days

Can I Be Fluent in Spoken English in 30 Days? Almost Impossible.

You might have read advertisements claiming to make you a fluent speaker in 30… and some even in (gasp!) 10 days. You might have also come across blogs and videos with similar claims.

Can you become fluent in 30 days?

Yes, if you’re already close to fluency.

Otherwise, almost impossible, which more or less means ‘no’.

However, that doesn’t mean you can’t improve your current level in 30 days. You can, but fluency… no.

I can say this from my observations of people starting from different base levels trying to become fluent speakers, but in this post I won’t impose my opinions. I’ll talk purely from the basic principles of how we pick new skills.

Improve Spoken English Without a Speaking Partner

17 Ways to Improve Spoken English Without a Speaking Partner

Are you trying to become better at spoken English, but don’t have partners to speak to, which commonly happens when you’re trying to learn English at home.

In this post I’ll cover several steps you can take to improve your spoken English when faced with this situation. This post is divided into three parts:

First, general tactics if you don’t have a speaking partner;

Second, how you can make your practice more holistic by having occasional conversations with others;

And third, few unique challenges that solo practitioners face.

Preposition rules

Common Prepositions – Plenty of Usages, Examples, and Quizzes

Most people falter on prepositions when they face a situation where they can’t decide between two (or even more) prepositions that both seem to be the correct answer. Few examples of such commonly-confused prepositions: (1) over and above; (2) at, in, and on. And there are plenty more.

Prepositions are best learnt when you learn them in groups of such commonly-confused prepositions and not as individual prepositions. After all, that’s where you make most mistakes.

In this post, you’ll learn prepositions in such groups – 17 of them covered here.

how to improve vocabulary

How to Build Vocabulary That Lasts – My Experience with 7,500+ Words?

(This post comes from my experience of adding 5,000+ 7,500+ words to my vocabulary that I can actually use when speaking and writing. What’s the point if you can’t put it to use, right? In this post, you’ll see decent dose of scientific principles and vocabulary exercises I adopted to accomplish this.)

Don’t you get impressed when a news anchor or other proficient speaker uses just the perfect word, and not a long-winded explanation, to describe a situation without a pause?

Those apt words are a result of a large active vocabulary.

We’ll learn more on what active vocabulary is later in the post, but in short it means vocabulary you can actually use when speaking and writing, the holy grail of any vocabulary-building exercise. If you introspect, you’ll realize that although you can understand lots of words when reading or listening (called passive vocabulary), you can use only a minuscule fraction of that in speaking and writing (called active vocabulary).

This post focuses on, first, building active vocabulary and, second, making this process efficient by building on words you already know – passive vocabulary – thereby making for faster progress.