study in daylight to increase productivity

Study Longer Without Getting Tired: Study in Daylight

Sunlight is better known for synthesis of vitamin D in our bodies and for improving our moods. But what is less appreciated is that it can also make us more productive.

If you study in sunlight (not direct exposure, though), you’ll be significantly more alert, less drowsy in the afternoon, thereby increasing your productivity. As a result, you’ll have a more effective study schedule and you’ll be able to study longer without getting tired.

what to eat when studying

What to Eat When Studying for Better Focus and Energy?

You would’ve heard it all – eat every 2-3 hours, don’t have too much caffeine, keep hydrated, eat healthy, and so on.

But do you know that certain types of food, which also happen to be the most regularly consumed by students, can send your energy level soaring to the top of the rollercoaster, and in short time, to its lowest point. And this crash can deprive you of the much needed energy to focus on the task at hand, including studying, something you can prevent by a better choice of what you eat or drink.

Imagine, this happening during an important day, say the day you’re taking an important test or the day you really need to slog at high efficiency to pull off that last-minute submission.

why take study breaks?

Why Study-Breaks? What Are Some Effective Study-Break Ideas?

Alejandro Lleras, Associate Professor of Psychology at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in his acclaimed study, found that brief diversion from your task can dramatically improve your ability to focus on a task for prolonged periods.

Your experience, too, will tell you that when you study without break for long duration, say 90 minutes, you tend to lose focus, your mind starts wavering.

So, if you’ve been slogging hard for over an hour on your assignment or for exam, you may be working well below your potential. Wasting time, in other words.

Moreover, you also need to be intentional about what you should be doing during those study-breaks, otherwise they’ll be less effective.

In this post, I’ll first cover why study breaks make you more productive and, toward the end, what are some good and some bad study-break ideas.

productivity tip for students

Productivity Tip for Students: Think Distant Before Short-Term

An ant, with great effort, was dragging a portion of a leaf several times its size towards its home, a small hole in the ground. On the way, it came across a small crack – a crevasse for its size – on the ground. Unable to find a way to go across, the ant stopped. It stayed there for a while trying different things, but couldn’t find a way. Eventually, after several attempts to find a way around, it put the leaf on the crack and walked over it to cross over to the other side.

After crossing the crack, it resumed its journey and soon reached the hole. What happens next frustrates it.

how procrastination wasted my two weeks

How Procrastination Wasted My Two Weeks?

According to this study, more than 32% university students rate procrastination a major problem and only 1% say they’ve never procrastinated.

We all know the cost procrastination, but we mostly evaluate it in terms of delay in the task or sub-par quality as a result of last-minute rush.

But, sometimes, as it happened with me, procrastination can lead to wastage of humongous amount of time.