HBS-Stanford dual admits

Why Bloomberg Survey on HBS-Stanford Dual Admits Is Not Representative?

A 2015 Bloomberg survey throws up surprising data on HBS-Stanford rivalry on MBA admissions. Of 63 dual admits (a good sample size considering that only about 150-odd applicants get accepted to both the schools) they surveyed, 56% opted for Stanford, 22% for HBS, and a whopping 22% for a school other than the two.

In this post, I’ll analyze the aforesaid data, using independent data on yield, number of dual admits, and number of accepted applicants, and show why it is not representative of the choices made by HBS-Stanford dual admits in the class of 2014.

(Warning: the analysis involves some calculation.)

8,000-Mile road-trip taught me route

Four Lessons This 9,237-Mile Road-Trip Taught Me

This was an epic road trip.

In this 17-day (Mar 04 to Mar 20, 2009), 9,237-mile road-trip, we passed through 21 states and, but for north, nearly touched the other three geographical corners of U.S.

(With snow slowing us down and with limited time on hand (we had to report back to the school), we gave up our plan to touch the northern border in Montana.)

The trip was all about fun and exploring a new country – right from ghost town of Jerome to Hollywood, unpaved roads of Perkinsville to 26-lane I-10 near Houston, bustling highways outside LA and D.C. to U.S. 50, the loneliest road in America.

The trip left me with four lessons.

One Step at a Time: That’s How I Survived Extreme Cold and Hunger at 15,000 Feet

One Step at a Time: That’s How I Survived Extreme Cold and Hunger at 15,000 Feet

We braved -7 degrees Celsius without sleeping bags.

We trekked 15 hours (a typical trek day is 7-8 hours) in a day.

We ascended nearly 6,500 feet (against recommended 1,500 feet ascent per day) in a day.

And to make it worse, we didn’t have food for 32 hours.

Such extremes could’ve easily proved fatal, but 25 of us survived, somehow, on this trek to Rupin Pass (15,250 feet).