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So far Anil has created 71 blog entries.

Can I Be Fluent in Spoken English in 30 Days? Almost Impossible.

2019-01-10T22:10:47+05:30By |Spoken English|

You might have read advertisements claiming to make you a fluent speaker in 30… and some even in (gasp!) 10 days. You might have also come across blogs and videos with similar claims.

You can learn spoken English fast, but can you become fluent in 30 days.

Yes, if you’re already close to fluency.

Otherwise, almost impossible, which more or less means ‘no’.

However, that doesn’t mean you can’t improve your current level in 30 days. You can, but fluency… no.

17 Ways to Improve Spoken English Without a Speaking Partner

2019-01-12T11:05:56+05:30By |Spoken English|

Are you trying to become better at spoken English, but don’t have partners to speak to, which commonly happens when you’re trying to learn English at home.

In this post I’ll cover several steps you can take to improve your spoken English when faced with this situation. This post is divided into three parts:

First, general tactics if you don’t have a speaking partner;

Second, how you can make your practice more holistic by having occasional conversations with others;

And third, few unique challenges that solo practitioners face.

Common English Phrases & Expressions (with examples) for 35+ Situations

2019-01-24T23:54:56+05:30By |Spoken English|

Compare following expressions in English used for the same purpose of asking someone sitting next to you to pass a book:

‘Pass the book.’

‘Can you pass the book?’

‘Could you pass the book?’

‘Could you pass the book, please?’

If you use the first expression, you’ll come across as rude. The person may still pass the book, but with a frown on your temerity to ‘order’ him.

The second is OK.

Preposition Exercises – 350+ Questions and Real Paragraphs

2019-01-17T22:30:52+05:30By |Grammar|

In the first few exercises in this post, you’ve pick the correct preposition from a given set of prepositions. Thereafter, it’s wide open. The answer can be any preposition. That’s what you’ll face in the real world, isn’t it? To take it further close to the real world, the last exercise contains few paragraphs (with missing prepositions) from Malcolm Gladwell’s book Outlier.

Common Prepositions – 230+ Examples and 10+ Quizzes

2019-01-17T22:23:32+05:30By |Grammar|

Most people falter on prepositions when they face a situation where they can’t decide between two (or even more) prepositions that both seem to be the correct answer. Few examples of such commonly-confused prepositions: (1) over and above; (2) at, in, and on. And there are plenty more.

Prepositions are best learnt when you learn them in groups of such commonly-confused prepositions and not as individual prepositions. After all, that’s where you make most mistakes.

In this post, you’ll learn prepositions in such groups – 17 of them covered here.

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