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3 Essential Grammar Rules for Spoken English

2019-01-12T19:29:05+00:00By |Grammar|

Some believe that better grammar means better spoken English.

That’s mistaken.

Once you know basic grammar such as tenses, prepositions, different forms of verbs, and subject-verb agreement, additional dose of grammar won’t shine your spoken English further. What you need, instead, is more speaking practice. More inputs – listening and reading.

This post is for beginners who are struggling with even basic grammar and don’t know which part of the grammar to start from to make their spoken English better at least from the perspective of not making silly grammatically errors such as:

How to Build Vocabulary That Lasts – My Experience with 7,500+ Words?

2018-11-25T18:24:47+00:00By |Vocabulary|

(This post comes from my experience of adding 5,000+ 7,500+ words to my vocabulary that I can actually use when speaking and writing. What’s the point if you can’t put it to use, right? In this post, you’ll see decent dose of scientific principles and vocabulary exercises I adopted to accomplish this.)

Don’t you get impressed when a news anchor or other proficient speaker uses just the perfect word, and not a long-winded explanation, to describe a situation without a pause?

Those apt words are a result of a large active vocabulary.

We’ll learn more on what active vocabulary is later in the post, but in short it means vocabulary you can actually use when speaking and writing, the holy grail of any vocabulary-building exercise. If you introspect, you’ll realize that although you can understand lots of words when reading or listening (called passive vocabulary), you can use only a minuscule fraction of that in speaking and writing (called active vocabulary).

This post focuses on, first, building active vocabulary and, second, making this process efficient by

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