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Write Sentences Like in Newspapers and Books [eBook and Course]

(Step-by-step process. Little grammar. Real-world examples. Practice exercises.)

Do your sentences lack variety? Do they go beyond sentences like these?

1. In case you need to reach out to the author, you may do so by writing at the following email id.

2. Because technology has improved a lot in the last ten years, smartphones have become better.

3. Climate change is the biggest challenge faced by us today, and the disturbing thing is that we’re the culprit because we’ve failed to change our consumption behavior despite warnings.

Do you play safe and write short sentences to avoid punctuation and other errors?

Do you want to write sentences like these?

1. By Saturday night, McIlroy had the momentum, sharing the lead with Hovland, a former collegiate star at Oklahoma State who taught himself the rudiments of the game by watching YouTube videos and was trying to become the first Norwegian to win a major. The New York Times

2. Truphone, a UK-based start-up that provides voice and data services for phones, tablets and IoT hardware by way of eSIM software integrated directly into the devices, has raised another round of funding to continue expanding its business. The company, which told TechCrunch today that it counts Apple as a key partner, has raised another £30 million, valuing Truphone at £410 million (or $38 million at a $516 million valuation at current rates). TechCrunch [Two sentences]

If yes, read on.

Why sentences are important?

Internet rules the world, and words are the currency of the web.

Despite boom in videos, writing remains an extremely important way of self-expression not just on the web but also in matters elsewhere: school, college, workplace, and more. Second, writing is subjected to more scrutiny than speech, as text – whether in soft or hard copy – is read and often reread, thereby exposing shortcomings far more easily.

And sentences are the building blocks of any writing. In words of Brooks Landon from his book Building Great Sentences:

The classic advice given to backpackers trying to limit the weight they have to carry is “Pay attention to the ounces, and the pounds take care of themselves”. Something very similar is true of writing: “Pay attention to your sentence, and most other writing problems take care of themselves.”

Sentences play an important role in standing one’s writing out. Wider range of sentences in any piece, of course, engages readers, but it does more. Certain types of sentences are made for certain situations, and if you use some other sentence in their place, you diminish reader’s experience. An example:

1A. The orcas moved in unison towards the iceberg, and it’s the kind that can’t sink ships but provide just enough real estate for seals to rest. [It’s a poor sentence: On seeing and, readers think that something important is coming, but what comes is just additional information about the iceberg.]

1B. The orcas moved in unison towards the iceberg, the kind that can’t sink ships but provide just enough real estate for seals to rest. [It’s a good sentence: Readers know that what comes after comma is additional information about the iceberg.]

What does the course contain?

You’ll learn how to write five types of sentences (details in a moment) that professional writers frequently use. And all this with little to no instruction in grammar. (The material though contains grammatical terms for those who’re interested in knowing them.) In other words, it’s made for a layperson.

In real pieces of writing though, features of two or more of the five types are often combined in a single sentence to create even better sentences. Such combinations have also been covered in the course.

Needless to say, while learning these sentences, you’ll also learn how to punctuate them with comma, which is a major source of error in such sentences. And you can also take exercises to practice writing these sentences.

Here are the examples of five types of sentences, followed by few of their combinations.

Adding a little story to a person or thing

1. The orcas moved in unison towards the iceberg, the kind that can’t sink ships but provide just enough real estate for seals to rest.

2A. The orcas, which look like dolphins and which fear nothing and terrorize almost everything in the ocean, moved in unison towards the iceberg.

2B. The orcas, considered the most-feared predator in the ocean that can prey on even great white sharks, moved in unison towards the iceberg.

Showing action or result

3. The orcas moved in unison towards the iceberg, creating a wave that swept off the seal resting on it. [If you’re a regular reader, you may have noticed such -ing additions at the end of a sentence separated by comma.]

Showing details

4. With hunger driving them to adopt ingenious ways to hunt, the orcas moved in unison towards the iceberg.

Expressing multiple relationships in the same sentence

5. After the orcas confirmed that a seal was indeed resting on the iceberg, they retreated and swam back in unison towards the iceberg, but the orcas’ first attempt at knocking off the seal by creating a wave didn’t succeed as it somehow clung on to the iceberg.

[These sentences are an extension of simpler sentences such as I didn’t attend office because I was down with fever and I’ll go to office tomorrow, but today I’ll just relax you would already be writing. Extending them, especially getting the comma right, can be a challenge for some in such sentences.]

Combining two or more of above five types

Let’s look at how combining two or more types creates even more powerful, informative sentences:

1. With hunger driving them to adopt ingenious ways to hunt, the orcas, which look like dolphins and which fear nothing and terrorizes almost everything in the ocean, moved in unison towards the iceberg, creating a wave that swept off the seal resting on it. [Type 4 + Type 2A + Type 3]

2. After the orcas confirmed that a seal was indeed resting on the iceberg, they retreated and swam back in unison towards the iceberg, creating a wave that swept off the seal, but the orcas’ first attempt didn’t succeed as it somehow clung on to the iceberg, forcing the orcas to make another attempt. [Type 3 + Type 3 + Type 5]

3. Great white sharks mysteriously disappeared off the coast of South Africa for weeks together, raising the suspicion of over-fishing as the reason behind, but the culprit turned out to be a pair of orcas, the dolphin-lookalike, most-feared predator in the ocean, who were preying on great whites for their liver. [Type 3 + Type 1 + Type 2A]

Who is this for?

Anyone who can write sentences like these can take this course:

1. In case you need to reach out to the author, you may do so by writing at the following email id.

2. Because technology has improved a lot in the last ten years, smartphones have become better.

3. Technology has improved a lot in the last ten years, but it will be hard for it to replace humans in many fields.

Does the course hold for a particular age group? Age-wise, I’ve seen even some Grade 6 students pick these sentences, their work though generally not being as strong as that of older students and adults. These are, for example, two sentences written by Grade 6 students:

1. The storm, which originated in Indian ocean, hit several districts on Tuesday night, destroying thousands of huts and crops and leaving people without electricity for more than two days.

[The student earlier wrote this: The storm from Indian ocean hit several districts on Tuesday night, and it destroyed thousands of huts and crops. It also left people without electricity for more than two days.]

2. The buffalo is grazing in the field, its tail wagging, its horns pointing towards me.

[Such sentences are common in fiction writing. However, a variant of this starting with with is commonly used in non-fiction.]

What people say?

“I used to write long sentences only occasionally earlier, fearing errors. Those I wrote were mostly of similar type – joined by and, but, so, because, after, etc. Moreover, some of those sentences used to feel bloated and tough to follow, but I had little clue about how to write better long sentences. With this course, I’m writing better sentences and gradually making them automatic with more and more use.”

Nimit

“Earlier, I rarely wrote long sentences because I knew only limited ways of writing them and was worried about messing up punctuation. Now, I rarely play safe as I feel more confident about writing wider variety of informative sentences, some of which are used by professional writers.”

Emma

Course and eBook

The course and the eBook have the same content, but the form is different. Whereas the course is mainly video-based, the eBook is mainly text-based (PDF).

The course also includes:

  • access to weekly office hours for three months for doubt clarification.
  • feedback on two pieces of writing using sentences learnt.

You can take your writing to the next level and impress people by writing advanced sentences like the ones in newspapers and books in a step-wise process. And the skill you gain stays useful for the rest of your life.

Highlights

  • Learn 5 types of advanced sentences, with little to no grammar
  • Learn combinations of 5 types in a step-wise process
  • Get the comma right
  • Get a handy list of rules and exceptions for easy reference
  • Hone your skills through practice exercises

Take your writing to the next level by writing advanced sentences like the ones in newspapers and books through this course containing 2.5 hours of video content, weekly office hours for 3 months, and feedback on two pieces of writing.

Money Back Guarantee: I’m confident you’ll find the course valuable, but in case you don’t, you can get full refund within 30 days.

Take your writing to the next level by writing advanced sentences like the ones in newspapers and books through this 63-page eBook.

Money Back Guarantee: I’m confident you’ll find the eBook valuable, but in case you don’t, you can get full refund within 30 days.

About

I’m Anil, the person behind this course and eBook.

I’m covering the topic of writing – and its support elements such as phrase, clause, sentence, and punctuation – on this website, which receives more than 3,000,000 learners every year. In the past, I’ve taught writing, which included writing sentences, to K-12 students from Grade 6 upwards and to college students. I’ve also designed curriculum on communication skills, including writing, for a national level college and trained its faculty members. I’ve critiqued punctuation of prominent publications, organizations, and personalities. And I’ve critiqued grammar books from popular publishers.

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