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Write Variety of Beginner Sentences: Short, Long, Informative… [eBook and Course]

(Step-by-step process. Little grammar. Real-world examples. Practice exercises.)

Our sentences are either a single idea or combination of ideas. Can you convert these six ideas, which together are telling a little story, into 2-4 logical sentences?

A. An employee collapsed on the factory floor.

B. This happened on Monday evening.

C. Fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions.

D. It’s a large mining company.

E. The company denied the accusation.

F. Workers are now planning to lodge a complaint with the local government.

Here is an average version:

On Monday evening, an employee collapsed on the factory floor. Fellow workers accused the large mining company of poor working conditions, but the company denied the accusation. Workers are now planning to lodge a complaint with the local government.

Here is a much better version:

On Monday evening, after a worker collapsed on the factory floor, fellow workers accused the company, a mining giant, of poor working conditions. The company, however, denied the accusation, so they’re are now planning to lodge a complaint with the local government.

[Commas, like you see in this case, can be tricky, but there are clear rules, with only few exceptions.]

Sentences in both versions are grammatically fine, but those in second are more impactful. Beginners don’t lack ideas; what they lack is skill in putting these ideas together to form a good sentence.

In this course, we’ll learn step-by-step how to write sentences like the two in second version. (The two sentences in the second version, by the way, are beginner sentences.) Here is how the first sentence has been put together step-wise:

Note: Subsequent additions have been underlined.

Step 1: Fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions.

Step 2: After a worker collapsed on the factory floor, fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions.

Step 3: On Monday evening, after a worker collapsed on the factory floor, fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions.

Step 4: On Monday evening, after a worker collapsed on the factory floor, fellow workers accused the company, a mining giant, of poor working conditions.

Why sentences are important?

Despite boom in videos, writing remains an extremely important way of self-expression not just on the web but also in matters elsewhere: school, college, workplace, and more. Second, writing is subjected to more scrutiny than speech, as text – whether in soft or hard copy – is read and often reread, thereby exposing shortcomings far more easily.

And sentences are the building blocks of any writing. Without variety of error-free sentences, your writing will bore readers in the best case and cast negative impression in the worst. Many poorly written emails, for example, don’t get read beyond 2-3 lines, rendering the important ask in the last paragraph or the attachment just a wish. And you would almost never get feedback from the receiver, leaving you at sea about what went wrong.

With variety of sentences though, you can create any kind of writing (email, letter, essay, petition, memo, report, recommendation, proposal, pitch, and so on) on your own and not depend on others for help or lift content from the internet. You may even be sought after for help by others. And the good part is that this skill, unlike many other skills, will be useful for the rest of your life.

What does the course contain?

You’ll learn how to write five types of beginner sentences (details in a moment). And all this with little to no instruction in grammar. (The material though contains grammatical terms for those who’re interested in knowing them.) In other words, it’s made for a layperson.

But the five types aren’t the most exciting part. Magic happens when you combine two or more of these five types in one sentence, like we did in four steps a while back.

In the course, each of the five types and their multiple combinations have been covered in detail. It also contains practice exercises to hone your skill in writing these sentences.

Punctuation – mainly comma – in these sentences can be confusing and is often a major source of error. The course will also go into clear rules – and the accompanying exceptions – in this regard.

Here are the examples of five types of sentences (under the categories of ‘Additions’ and ‘Relationships’), followed by few of their combinations. They’ve been formed using earlier-mentioned six (A to F) ideas.

Additions (1-2)

1. On Monday evening, an employee collapsed on the factory floor.

2. Fellow workers accused the company, a mining giant, of poor working conditions.

Relationships (3-5)

You can express relationships between two ideas through three types of relationship words:

3A. After an employee collapsed on the factory floor, fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions.

3B. After an employee collapsed on the factory floor, fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions, though the company denied the accusation.

4A. Fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions, but the company denied the accusation.

4B. Fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions, but the company denied the accusation, so they’re now planning to lodge a complaint with the local government.

5. Fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions; however, the company denied the accusation.

Note: More variations can be formed, though only two have been shown in 3 and 4.

Combining two or more of above five types

Let’s look at how combining two or more types creates even more powerful, informative sentences:

1. Fellow workers accused the company of poor working conditions after an employee collapsed on the factory floor, but the company denied the accusation. [Type 3A + Type 4A]

2. On Monday evening, after a worker collapsed on the factory floor, fellow workers accused the company, a mining giant, of poor working conditions.

[Type 1 + Type 2 + Type 3A. This is the sentence we got earlier in four steps, where Step 2 was combining Type 3A, Step 3 was combining Type 1, and Step 4 was combining Type 2.]

3. After an employee collapsed on the factory floor, the workers accused the company, a mining giant, of poor working conditions, but the company denied the accusation, so they’re now planning to lodge a complaint with the local government. [Type 2 + Type 3A + Type 4B]

Who is this for?

This course is for anyone who can write six beginner sentences mentioned earlier in A to F and who wants to learn how to combine them into better beginner sentences without errors in comma.

Does the course hold for a particular age group? Age-wise, I’ve seen most Grade 6 students pick the five types of sentences and their combinations well.

What people say?

“I was aware of some of the topics covered in the course, but I was sometimes making punctuation errors while writing those sentences. Also, earlier I rarely combined different types of sentences to write better sentences.”

Apoorv

“I’m able to write wider range of sentences now, especially the long ones. Previously, the moment I stretched a sentence into long zone, I got this feeling of making a mistake in comma or something else. Also, I’ve reduced commas by pause, which can lead to errors.”

Jacob

Course and eBook

The course and the eBook have the same content, but the form is different. Whereas the course is mainly video-based, the eBook is mainly text-based (PDF).

The course also includes:

  • access to weekly office hours for three months for doubt clarification.
  • feedback on two pieces of writing using sentences learnt.

You can significantly improve your writing by improving your beginner sentences and by cutting down on comma errors through a step-wise process, like the four steps you saw at the beginning.

Better writing enables you to create any type of piece – social media post, blog, email, essay, petition, and so on – without depending on others or lifting content from the internet, and to even help others. And the skill you gain stays useful for the rest of your life.

Highlights

  • Learn 5 types of beginner sentences, with little to no grammar
  • Learn combinations of 5 types in a step-wise process
  • Get the comma right
  • Get a handy list of rules and exceptions for easy reference
  • Hone your skills through practice exercises

Write better beginner sentences, and improve your writing, through this course containing 2.5 hours of video content, weekly office hours for 3 months, and feedback on two pieces of writing.

Money Back Guarantee: I’m confident you’ll find the course valuable, but in case you don’t, you can get full refund within 30 days.

Write better beginner sentences, and improve your writing, through this 56-page eBook.

Money Back Guarantee: I’m confident you’ll find the eBook valuable, but in case you don’t, you can get full refund within 30 days.

About

I’m Anil, the person behind this course and eBook.

I’m covering the topic of writing – and its support elements such as phrase, clause, sentence, and punctuation – on this website, which receives more than 3,000,000 learners every year. In the past, I’ve taught writing, which included writing sentences, to K-12 students from Grade 6 upwards and to college students. I’ve also designed curriculum on communication skills, including writing, for a national level college and trained its faculty members. I’ve critiqued punctuation of prominent publications, organizations, and personalities. And I’ve critiqued grammar books from popular publishers.

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